Archived blog 

March 23, 2015

Along the Well is a participatory walking perforrmance that I created at the Woodford Academy Museum, the oldest surviving building in The Blue Mountains, Australia on March 21st 2015. In single file, we followed the natural water source, out the back to the line along the rock, around the unmarked graveyard, along the dried up creek, past the second spring, and back again in a circle. It was a day of ritual with 50 or so of us acknowledging together the presence of water on the site as its necessity to mankind for all time. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 18, 2015

Curated by Sarah Breen Lovett, ‘Palimpsest Performances’ is a series that explores contemporary art performance, as a way of simultaneously drawing forth the past and layering present interpretations of the unique architecture and grounds of the Woodford Academy.  Palimpsest Performance #2 by contemporary artists Ben Denham and Honi Ryan are two separate but intertwined performances, both explore the land and its resources as communication device. Through an examination of walking as art practice Honi Ryan communes with the site, exploring and revealing its traces and history as a navigation tool. While Ben Denham's performance uses water from the land to create sound instruments which are calibrated to the geometries of site. Ben Denham  grew up in the Blue Mountains and studied visual arts at the University of Western Sydney. He works with performance video and make machines that engage different parts of the body in the process of drawing and writing. Honi Ryan is an interdisciplina...

February 28, 2015

I have been on a week long residency at Bilpin International Ground for Creative Initiatvies (BigCi) in rural Australia developing work around the theme of Strange Embrace for the Blue Mountains Cultural Centre (BMCC). Working with 4 other inspiring artists: Cath Barcan, Anne Graham, Astra Howard, and Daniel Kojta, we created a warm and collaborative environment in the serene nature right on the edge of  Wollemi National Park. The next stages of this project will be some collaborative action research in the gallery and in the public, culminating in a group show opening at the BMCC city gallery onMay 29th, 2015. 

 

My individual practice there was to explore the theme of Intimacy over Distance, and how we can feel through technology. I created a water drawing as a process ritual, which I then learned is an activity done in public parks in China, and an ancient Zen buddhist gesture. I am astonished at how many of the things that I do with my body intuitively a...

October 24, 2014

In October I was an artist in residence at ‘Elsewhere‘ in Greensboro, North Carolina, US.

Elsewhere is a living museum in a former thrift store on the main street of Greensboro. The artists and organisors of the museum live on site in the old three story house, and the premise of the residency is that you bring nothing in, and take nothing out, but constantly remake the museum with the stuff you find there. And there's a lot of it!

 

Elsewhere functions as a living community and so the daily life activities and us doing them in the museum are as much a a part of the organism of elsewhere as the quirky objects and spaces that house it. The kitchen was my favourite installation, that and the ghost room. It's open to the public about half the time, so you constantly have people walking through your living and making environments. 

 

One of my favourite moments was swinging on the swings in the streetfront window when a passerby stopped, backed up, looked at me and said, "oh, I thought you were...

October 15, 2014

Abi Tariq and Honi Ryan

Act of being; active reading/writing.

 

31a Bienal De Arte De São Paulo, Brazil.

exhibition area C. 5:15pm October 12th, 2014. 

Perpendicular Bienal performance #4 

 

 

 

 

Two people walk through the exhibition space of the 31a bienal of São Paulo. One is reading aloud from a book, turning the pages rapidly and speaking fragmented sections of the text interspersed with words, sentences and ideas that are read from the surrounding works. Walking side by side, the other person writes down things that stand out, creating yet another generation of meaning, as they consider the words arbitrary relationship to the space and it’s contents. This piece was devised as an invisible performance, as we were no longer permitted to perform in the exhibition we built this performance to go unnoticed by security staff.

 

Below is the text that was developed as a result of the performance. 

 

 

October 15, 2014

Honi Ryan and Abi Tariq

Notes on not-knowing.

participative performance - a telepathic encounter

31a Bienal De Arte De São Paulo, Brazil.
Pavilion foyer, 6-7:30pm October 11th, 2014.

Perpendicular Bienal performance #3 

Two artists sit opposite each other, lock in eye contact and form an unspoken connection. Periodically, when a thought solidifies in their minds, they write it down and turn it upside down, stacking the notes to create an unknown sequence of thoughts. Every 15 minutes they lay the note cards out to reveal the sequence, a sometimes fragmented and often uncannily synchronised conversation.

Pens and small note cards are placed in the space offering others to engage in the same kind of encounter. Many pairs partook in the action, and revealed the connection we can have with strangers when we consciously choose to engage, even in silence. One participant noted that we look beyond the eyes to see the person, and in that we see ourselves. 

Notes written between two strangers:

Profoun...

October 14, 2014

31a Bienal De Arte De São Paulo, Brazil. Oct 

 

I have just participated in the ‘Perpendicular Bienal’ – a curated performance intervention on the São Paulo 31st Biennale. It was a 4 day event in the Bienal foundation in Ibirapuera Park, and included about 30 artists. The theme was ‘I am present’. We worked together to create a peaceful provocative presence on the biennial pavilion. It had free entry so attracted a diverse audience. The pieces ranged from individual to collaborative, some artists responded to the situation and space and others mounted pieces they had done elsewhere in the situation of the exhibition. By the third day the security staff was fed up with us entering and exiting the exhibition, and some artists had made actions that were not looked upon well – so even though the biennial curator welcomed us to the exhibit in person and encouraged our work, ultimately the security couldn’t deal with it, and we eventually got banned from the main exhibition space. On the thir...